UNESCO-NIE Centre for Arts Research in Education (CARE)

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Journal: 
Australian Art Education
Name(s) of Author/Editor(s): 
Julie Rosewarne Foster
Refereed: 
Yes
Volume No.: 
16
Issue No.: 
3
Page numbers of article: 
43-48
Year of publication: 
1993
Country of publication: 
Australia
Country of Research Data: 
Australia
Language: 
English
Abstract: 
There are many feminisms. In this article the author identifies and considers aspects of the feminist cohort which are advancing with the postmodernist movement. Their recent critique of visual representation and theories of subjectivity will impact upon the art curriculum. The phrase 'sexually inclusive curriculum' became part of the idiom in the early 1980s, and then gave way to the 'gender inclusive curriculum'. Teachers have heard about 'girls and maths' and 'girls and science' but not a great deal about girls (and boys) and art. Educators now understand that women have always made art and that discovery has permeated the walls of the 'Modern Art' establishment. It seems it is also a matter of understanding how the subject takes its position in society. Feminist post-structuralism uncovers the flaws and assumptions in humanist discourses. How we are depicted, how we are represented has enormous ramifications for how we become. The author suggests that perhaps the present curriculum is inadequate to meet the needs of contemporary thought to do with cultural representation and visuality.
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